The 14 principles

Here you find the short overview of the 14 principles. For more details you can click on each of them, or you can download the entire document.

As a necessary introduction to the 14 principles, it is recommended to read why a post-2020 perspective is being discussed here, its implications as well as the limitations of this work.

Principle A: Binding and ambitious 2030 RES deployment targets are needed.

Principle B: The electricity markets will not do it alone – even where the full costs of (variable) renewables are lower than average market prices, policy intervention will be needed to ensure that sufficient investment is attracted to RES-E projects.

Principle C: The schemes to remunerate investments in renewables should be oriented to deliver the politically agreed RES deployment targets.

Principle D: The schemes to remunerate investments in renewables should enable a continuous development of a portfolio of different RES-E technologies, which appear of relevance for meeting 2050 targets.

Principle E: The schemes to remunerate investments in renewables should be oriented to maximize the net benefits of the long-term transition of the energy system.

Principle F: The schemes to remunerate investments should be oriented at favouring the transition towards a sustainable energy supply system.

Principle G: The schemes to remunerate investments in renewables should allow for a differentiation between RES-E generation technologies and plant size, where this is necessary.

Principle H: The location of (renewable) generation investments matters, and will matter more, as we progress towards higher shares of variable renewables. Therefore, remuneration schemes or complementary policies should provide locational signals to investors in RES and balancing re-sources so as to promote system efficiency and reliability.

Principle I: The schemes to remunerate investments in renewables should avoid excessive rents for RES-E generators.

Principle J: The schemes to remunerate renewable investment should be effectively open for new entrants to develop projects.

Principle K: The schemes to remunerate investments in renewables should allow for prompt adjustments (of the support levels) for new investments, responding to changing conditions, while guaranteeing that the framework for investments and the RES deployment strategy are stable enough to attract investment capital and to achieve the long-term targets.

Principle L: The schemes to remunerate investments in renewables should be accompanied by dedicated policy instruments, which are able to protect vulnerable consumers from additional net energy costs caused by the transition to a renewable energy system.

Principle M: Debates around the design of remuneration schemes should take into account the need to create and maintain political acceptance as well as political feasibility.

Principle N: RES-E remuneration schemes and market frameworks should be further aligned and coordinated across Europe without jeopardizing the ability to adjust them to local contexts.